2014 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 34,000 times in 2014. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 13 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

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Hasan in Madrid taken by our mutual friend Gemma Garcia

Hasan in Madrid taken by our mutual friend Gemma Garcia

 

I first met Hasan Niyazi when I was an early blogger, like so many others sharing in his memory on this day. His gentle critiques propelled me in to a new world of art and history, the start of a passion that will never truly be quenched. The friendship and inspiration this one person brought to my life cannot be replaced. So many were touched by him, and the posts of this day come from collegues scattered over the world feeling this same loss.  H was a muse. His friendship and acceptance of a non-academe taught me that even beginners can be a part of art and history appreciation, as long as the facts were correct and I cited my sources.

 

Portrait of a Young Man

Portrait of a Young Man

 

I discovered Raphael’s Portrait of a Young Man while flipping though “The Rape of Europa” by Lynn Nicholas.  Another facet of art and history propelled me down the rabbit hole of research as I learned about the still missing art stolen during WWII. I hungrily devoured this book and “Monuments Men” by Robert Edsel.  These studies led me to Noah Charney’s “Secret History of Art” on the Daily Beast.  H and I had several discussions about the possibilities of this art still being found, and given the latest news on Nazi art discoveries in recent months, I believe that possibility is still alive. The Czartoryski Raphael is one of these lost paintings, and I considered writing this post on the subject.   However, the best written article on this painting is by H, and as it covers every detail, I found I could add nothing to the conversation.  The questions over the provenance of this painting, the theft, and the urban myth carried forward by The Simpsons on the fate of this painting can be found on Hasan’s blog, 3 Pipe.

 

Clip from the Monuments Men

Clip from the Monuments Men

 

Simpsons Clip

Simpsons Clip

May the fellowship of this group continue as we share our memories of Hasan, with new art and history discoveries.

Cheers, Mary Jo


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